The Art of Catching Glimpses

theparisreview:

“When you’re traveling, you understand what you really need, or want, or find comforting—what you can do without and what’s essential. In my case, traveling illuminates an addiction to cookbooks.”
Sadie Stein on food for thought.

theparisreview:

“When you’re traveling, you understand what you really need, or want, or find comforting—what you can do without and what’s essential. In my case, traveling illuminates an addiction to cookbooks.”

Sadie Stein on food for thought.

(via shereese)

theparisreview:

“He is always on the brink of suicide … because he seeks salvation through the routine formulas suggested to him by the society in which he lives.”
This week’s staff picks, including Umberto Eco on Charlie Brown, the cult of Jeff Koons, and the small town that has become a beer ad.

theparisreview:

“He is always on the brink of suicide … because he seeks salvation through the routine formulas suggested to him by the society in which he lives.”

This week’s staff picks, including Umberto Eco on Charlie Brown, the cult of Jeff Koons, and the small town that has become a beer ad.

npr:

Before I went to Ferguson, Mo., to cover the aftermath of the Michael Brown shooting, a friend who had already been there reporting joked that he was certain that every person in the town had already been interviewed. And sure enough, the media crunch on was intense on West Florissant, the main boulevard that was the site of protests and clashes with the police in the wake of the shooting of Michael Brown.

During the middle of the workday, it sometimes seemed like there was a 1:1 ratio between protesters and members of the press. The demonstrators typically wouldn’t come out in full force until the day went on; folks were either at work or waiting out the brutal humidity. Later at night, the people on West Florissant would get younger and rowdier, and it was those folks who were at the center of the skirmishes with the police we all saw on television and on social media.

But Ferguson isn’t a very large town. All those flash bangs and tear gas canisters were going off just behind people’s homes or in front of their small businesses. It’s your typical American suburb, and in many ways, it still was, even with all the clamor going on. Photographer Eric Kayne and I walked around the neighborhood chatting with people while they worked or relaxed, enjoying the last few weeks of summer, even as their town had become the most recent locus for Our Ongoing National Conversation on Race.

Scenes From The Ferguson We Didn’t See On TV

Photo credit: Eric Kayne for NPR

theparisreview:

“When you’re traveling, you understand what you really need, or want, or find comforting—what you can do without and what’s essential. In my case, traveling illuminates an addiction to cookbooks.”
Sadie Stein on food for thought.

theparisreview:

“When you’re traveling, you understand what you really need, or want, or find comforting—what you can do without and what’s essential. In my case, traveling illuminates an addiction to cookbooks.”

Sadie Stein on food for thought.

Samsung's Unpacked 2014 Episode 2 Event

Join CNET Live for Samsung’s Unpacked 2014 launch event. Samsung likely will show off its new Galaxy Note 4 phablet — its phone-tablet hybrid that spawned a new category of smartphones — as well as other wearable devices during an event to be held simultaneously in Beijing, Berlin, and New York.

USA TODAY: Cobra's severed head bites, kills chef

From USA TODAY

Cobra’s severed head bites, kills chef

(NEWSER) – A chef killed a snake — but the snake had enough time to kill him back. Chef Peng Fan, of Guangdong Province in China, cut off the head of a spitting cobra as he prepared to dice its body for a soup, the Daily Mail reports. But 20 minutes later, as Peng was tossing the head in the trash, the head was still functioning. That’s when the venomous creature bit the chef, who died before anti-venom could be provided. “We … could hear screams coming from the kitchen,” says one restaurant guest. The bite results in paralysis and asphyxiation, the Daily Mirror notes. “It is perfectly possible that the head remained alive and bit Peng’s hand,” says an expert, adding that reptiles can usually function for up to an hour, even after being decapitated. “By the time a snake has lost its head, it’s effectively dead as basic body functions have ceased, but there is still some reflexive action. It means snakes have the capability of biting and injecting venom even after the head has been severed.”

USA TODAY on your mobile device:
http://www.usatoday.com/mobile-apps

USA TODAY: 5 things you need to know Tuesday

From USA TODAY

5 things you need to know Tuesday

Obama faces decision on military aid for Ukraine Russian President Vladimir Putin and Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko will meet Tuesday with other European leaders in their first face-to-face talks since June. Though Obama has been quietly letting Germany take the lead on the diplomatic front as Ukraine’s standoff with Russia escalates, what he and his deputies communicate at the talks could play a pivotal role in whether Russia succeeds in disabling Ukraine’s economic recovery and permanently destabilizing Europe’s second-largest country. Serena Williams, Roger Federer take to the courts Serena Williams (No. 1 seed for women) and Roger Federer (No. 2 seed for men) both have their debut U.S. Open matches Tuesday. Williams faces fellow American Taylor Townsend. Williams is the favorite for a three-peat at the event, something that hasn’t been done since the mid-1970s. Even if she does that, “it will be a bad season – for her,” says her coach, Patrick Mouratoglou. She hasn’t won a major championship since her second consecutive U.S. Open a year ago. Federer faces Marinko Matosevic from Australia. For Federer, there might never be a better chance to seize an 18th Grand Slam title. He’s had a string of solid runs in Wimbledon, Toronto and Cincinnati, and he can take advantage of the fact that Rafael Nadal is sidelined by a wrist injury.

USA TODAY on your mobile device:
http://www.usatoday.com/mobile-apps

50 likes!

50 likes!